symphony
(SIM-foe-nee)


[Eng.]


In the early 18th century, the term "symphony" was applied to any instrumental prelude, interlude, or postlude. In modern usage, the term is applied to a large composition for orchestra, generally in three or four movements. The symphony may also be defined as a sonata for orchestra. The earlier symphonies, those of the Classical era, were generally simpler, and of a smaller scale. By the late Romantic era, the symphony had grown in number of movements, length of movements, number of instruments, variety of instruments, and dynamic range.

See also [Eng.] symphony; [Fr.] symphonie (f); [Ger.] Sinfonie (f); [It.] sinfonia (f); [Sp.] sinfonía (f).


Table of musical translations


SUGGESTED LISTENING EXAMPLES:

Symphony, Classical:
Haydn: Symphony No. 45 in F-sharp minor (Farewell), I
W. W. Norton - 4-CD Musical Example Bank -- Disc 3, Track 5
Haydn: Symphony No. 94 in G major (Surprise), III
W. W. Norton - 4-CD Musical Example Bank -- Disc 3, Track 2
Mozart: Symphony No. 40 in G minor, K. 550, I
W. W. Norton - 4-CD Musical Example Bank -- Disc 1, Track 32
Mozart: Symphony No. 40 in G minor, K. 550, IV
W. W. Norton - 4-CD Musical Example Bank -- Disc 3, Track 3

Symphony, Romantic:
Mendelssohn: Symphony No. 4 in A major, Op. 90 (Italian), IV

W. W. Norton - 4-CD Musical Example Bank -- Disc 1, Track 40
Dvořák: Symphony No. 9 in E minor, Op. 95 (From the New World), II
W. W. Norton - 4-CD Musical Example Bank -- Disc 1, Track 35

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