Ligature
(LIH-gah-chur)


[Eng.]


  1. In medieval notation, the ligature was a symbol indicating that two or more pitches should be joined together, indicating their pitches and rhythm. This symbol did not necessarily denote that the same syllable should be sung to those notes. The ligature was the early version of the beams used in modern notation.

    See also beam.

  2. A slur; a group of notes performed in one breath. In vocal music, a modern ligature denotes that a single syllable should be sung to two or more notes.
  3. Device used on woodwind instruments to hold the reed to the mouthpiece. The ligature is normally made of metal and acts as a clamp to hold the reed secure.


More about notes
| Dictionary Home | Dictionary Appendix |